If you or someone you know is in crisis, contact the Military Crisis Line or call 911: 1-800-273-8255, press 1 or Text 838255

Opioids and Alcohol Don’t Mix

It’s easy to mix alcohol and prescription opioids by mistake. You may plan to get a beer with friends after work or have a glass of wine with dinner. But if you were just prescribed an opioid, don’t forget your health care provider likely told you not to drink alcohol while taking it. Be aware, prescription opioids and alcohol are a bad mix.

Prescription opioid and alcohol use for Service members

Unique military factors like high stress duties or time away from family and friends can sometimes tempt Service members to turn to risky drug use. On their own, alcohol and prescription opioids can cause serious health concerns if not used properly but mixing the two can increase those risks.

Why is mixing prescription opioids and alcohol risky?

Mixing these together can cause:

  • Sleepiness or dizziness
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Mood swings
  • Loss of balance
  • Memory loss
  • Impaired vision
  • Hallucinations, which is seeing or hearing things that are not real
  • Slowed breathing or heart failure

These risks can directly impact your health, job and relationships. Before pushing the boundaries of mixing alcohol and prescription opioids, think twice about the many ways it can harm your life.

About one in five prescription opioid deaths in the U.S. involve alcohol.

If you are prescribed opioids, use them safely and as directed by your health care provider. No matter how long you are taking prescription opioids, do not drink alcohol while taking them.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, contact the Military Crisis Line or call 911: 1-800-273-8255, press 1 or Text 838255